What Causes High Rdw-cv?


Could a low RDW cause me to be so tired. Also what are the causes of low RDW?

My blood test show a low RDW. What does this indicate and could it cause me to be tired?

RDW is red cell distribution width comparing smallest to largest. Your doc needs to determine the cause of the variation in size, as there may be more than one explanation. Be well....

what does high HDL Levels and high Red blood distribution width mean?

Hi, I have had blood test done and my HDL and red blood distribution width has come back abnormally high? What does that mean? What kind of conditions/problems can this be due to? Is there anything I can do to bring it back into a normal range? Thanks Simon

High HDL level (> 60 mg/dL), optimal condition considered protective against heart disease.

The red blood cell distribution width (RDW or RCDW) is a measure of the variation of red blood cell (RBC) width that is reported as part of a standard complete blood count. Usually red blood cells are a standard size of about 6–8 μm. Certain disorders, however, cause a significant variation in cell size. Higher RDW values indicate greater variation in size. Normal reference range in human red blood cells is 11–15%.
High red blood cell distribution width is due to:--
* Iron Deficiency Anemia: usually presents with high RDW with low MCV
* Folate and vitamin B12 deficiency anemia: usually presents with high RDW and high MCV
* Recent Hemorrhage: typical presentation is high RDW with normal MCV

what is RDW when taking a blood test?

when taking a blood test what is RDW?

The red blood cell distribution width, RDW, or RCDW is a measure of the variation of red blood cell (RBC) width that is reported as part of a standard complete blood count. Usually red blood cells are a standard size of about 6-8μm. Certain disorders, however, cause a significant variation in cell size. Higher RDW values indicate greater variation in size. Normal reference range in human red blood cells is 11 - 15%. If anemia is observed, RDW test results are often used together with mean corpuscular volume (MCV) results to determine the possible causes of the anemia. It is mainly used to differentiate an anemia of mixed causes from an anemia of a single cause. Vitamin B12 deficiency produces a macrocytic (large cell) anemia with a normal RDW. However, iron deficiency anemia initially presents with a varied size distribution of red blood cells, and as such shows an increased RDW. In the case of a mixed iron and B12 deficiency, there will normally be a mix of both large cells and small cells, causing the RDW to be elevated. An elevated RDW, that is red blood cells of unequal sizes, is known as anisocytosis.

Blood Test Results?

I recently had a blood test and these items were flagged. Chloride 108 MCH 31.9 RDW 14.9 Can anybody explain what this means? Thanks!

MCH is your mean corpscular hemoglobin.
What this is telling you is how much hemoglobin is being carried by your red blood cells. Yours is normal only .9 above the normal, this isn't a bad thing though, it would only be a concern if it was really low. Hemoglobin is what carries the oxygen, so if it was low, it would mean your red cells couldnt transport oxygen as efficiently

RDW is your Random distribution weight, this is a measurement that tells us if your red cells are all the right size. The normal range for that is around 13

here are some of the reasons that could be high, talk to your doctor though before you try and diagnose yourself :)

The RDW is often increased in:

B12 and Pernicious anemia
Folic acid anemia
Iron deficiency anemia combined with other anemia
Hemolytic anemia
Transfusions
Sideroblastic anemia
Alcohol abuse
Various less common and hereditary anemias

And as far as the chloride goes, it depends on if it was a blood, urine, or sweat chloride.

good luck

My RDW and LYMPH count is high and my MCV and MCH is low what does this mean?

I have been experiencing slight pain in my lower right abdomen for the past three weeks. Is this the reason why my counts are off? Could this be an infection in progress due to these off blood counts?

"My RDW and LYMPH count is high and my MCV and MCH is low what does this mean?" -- I've said it before and I'll say it again: The only person who should be interpreting your test results is the health care provider who ordered them. I don't know your health history, I have no other results of previous tests to compare with or consider as part of a total picture. I did not perform an abdominal exam on you, I don't know your vital signs, age, gender, etc. Therefore, I cannot tell what this means in terms of you....I can only tell you what results such as your may suggest in general, what conditions they are associated with. Your results may relate to other diagnostics you've had but I have no way to know if this is so.

I also don't what know what the precise counts are because you haven't disclosed this information. "High" and "low" can be relative. RDW, MCV and MCH are parts of red blood cell indices, another way to say red blood cell count. "Indices" is the plural form of the word "index." Indices are an analysis of your red blood cells (RBCs).

An RDW is the red blood cell distribution width. The RDW is the size (width) differences of your RBCs and is the measurement of the width of the size distribution curve on a histogram. This element of an index is useful in predicting anemias early before symptoms occur. An elevated RDW can indicate iron deficiency, folic acid deficiency or vit. B deficiency anemias. It can also indicate homozygous hemoglobinopathy. There is no decreased RDW. It's either elevated or not and it's not related to infection. (Are you beginning to truly understand now why labs should be interpreted by your provider? For example, how many lay-people know there are several types of anemia???)

An MCV is the mean corpuscular volume and gives information about the size of your RBCs. A decreased level is associated with microcytic and iron deficiency anemias, rheumatoid arthritis and a number of other conditions. It's not related to infection.

An MCH is the mean corpuscular hemoglobin and gives information about the weight of your RBCs. A decreased level is associated with microcytic and hypochromic anemia, to name two conditions. It's not related to infection.

LYMPH is short for lymphocyte count and is part of a white blood cell differential, a breakdown of white blood cells by cell type. Or call it an itemized list, if you prefer. Elevated lymphocytes (lymphocytosis) occur in chronic and viral infections. A slightly elevated count may not be very significant but severe lymphocytosis is commonly caused by chronic lymphocytic leukemia. There are a few other conditions associated with lymphcytosis but the degree of elevation matters.

I advise you to be cautious when asking strangers to interpret your labs and other diagnostic tests. For the most part, you're appealing to people with no medical/nursing background, education, training or experience. No real health care provider will give you an answer that states definitely what's going on. We can't. And don't take the answers you get as gospel truth or, in some cases, even founded in reality. You require clinical correlation. You need a follow up visit with your provider to review your labs.

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