How Do Bones Determine Age?


What features of the skull, do you think, might be used to determine age and gender?

What features of the skull, do you think, might be used to determine age and gender?

Gender, I don't think you can. (But you can tell by the pelvic bone.) Age, how much the three bones that make up the cranium have fused. (The "soft spot" on a baby's head occurs because the cranial bones are still not together.)

What are the names of the 94 bones that we lose as we age?

I know that as infants we have 300 bones, and as we age the bones fuse together, leaving us with 206. I need to know the names of the 94 that were fused, or at least where i can find out.

You don't lose any of them. The reason we have 300 bones when we are infants is because all of our bones are in different pieces in order for them to grow as we age. As we grow, the bones begins to fuse together, leaving us with 206 complete bones. As for which of them fuse, it's every single one. The bones of the skull, the vertebrae, the long bones, etc.

How is an exponential function used to determine the age of bones and ruins?

How is an exponential function used to determine the age of bones and ruins? Links and info that shows where you got your answer are really helpful!!!!

You're probably talking about carbon dating. Carbon-14 is a radioactive isotope of carbon that decays exponentially into carbon-12. Since we know the ratio of C-14 to C-12 in a living thing that is still exchanging carbon with the environment, we can look at how much C-14 is left at a given time and use the exponential decay function to find out how long something has been dead.

I didn't use a source, but you should find a lot of information if you just google "carbon dating". Good luck.

How do we determine actual age of an individual?

I mean biological age, how its done for example in forensics? is it through carbon dating but that is very time comsuming, isnt it?

When identifying a dead body, scientists cannot tell with 100% certainty what the person's age is, but they can come up with a reasonable estimate based on a variety of features. Teeth are one way. For example people get their "12 year molars" around the age of 12, but there is a range of ages during which they typically appear. The same goes with wisdom teeth, which usually appear during the late teens or early 20s, and other dental features. Other bones can also be useful. People go through growth spurts during specific periods of their life, and the bones reflect these. I don't know the details, but I know that various features of bones, and probably other tissues, correlate closely with age, and a forensic anthropologist or other specialist can combine several different features to determine the most likely age range for the individual at the time of their death.

Dating using radioactive isotopes, including carbon, is useful for dating objects and skeletal remains in terms of how long it has been since they were deposited. If you want to know whether a skeleton is from a person who lived 100 years ago or 100,000 years ago, you would use radioactive isotopes. If you want to know if the person was 15 years old or 50 years old at the time of death, you would use dental and other skeletal features.

How do the scientists estimate the age of the fossilized corpses?

Like the new one they found- they estimate the age to be 4.4 million years. How do they determine that? I know it has to do with the bone, but how exactly do they estimate exact age?

<<I know it has to do with the bone, but how exactly do they estimate exact age?>>

Almost certainly, not from the bone. Rather, it's a matter of determining the age of the stratum from which the bones came. That can be done by relative dating, perhaps radiometric dating and various other techniques. The best way to find out in this instance is to get hold of a copy of the description. That ought to include the basis of the age.

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